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Farmer’s Almanac
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There are flowers enough in the summertime,

More flowers than I can remember.
But none with the
purple, gold, and red
That dyes the flowers of September!


–Mary Howitt (1799–1888)



Calendar

Debut Day

Full Harvest Moon


Citizenship Day


Ember Days


Autumnal Equinox


Harvest Home


GARDENING

Survey the Shrubbery
Garden Musings Podcast

FOOD

The Best Apple Varieties
Our Favorite Apple Recipes

HOUSEHOLD RECIPES

Carpet Freshener

Wood Floor Polish


Rug Cleaner



Video profiles online.
Meet Chef Schlow, creator of the
Nation’s Best Burger

Who doesn’t love a free
gift?!





 

Enter Almanac.com giveaway.

Plus, see what our friends at YankeeMagazine.com
and NewEngland.com are giving away!


The Best Apple Varieties

Not sure what type of apples to use to make
applesauce or a pie?
Here’s a chart with the very best baking and cooking apples in North
America.

Our Favorite Apple Recipes

Step into autumn with these tasty apple recipes
from our archives.

Apple Ginger Quick Bread
Very easy to make and great for freezing.

Apple-Stuffed Acorn Squash
Wonderful with beef or pork.
Fresh Apple Mint Salsa
Serve with lamb or over grilled
salmon.
Perfect Apple Pie
Serve with a cup of coffee or tea, and
enjoy!

Included in our new The Old Farmer’s Almanac
Everyday Cookbook
are
recipes for Apple Kuchen, Classic Apple Pie, German Apple
Pancakes, Ham Apple Hash, plus many more seasonal
recipes.

 

 

Today is The 2009 Old Farmer’s
Almanac
Debut Day. The 217th edition of this publication
is now on newsstands and in bookstores everywhere. The Almanac
is filled with up-to-the-minute facts and figures for every
day of the year, as well as all-new feature stories and
helpful advice. Of course, you’ll get a full year of weather
predictions for your area, too. Look for some interesting
weather patterns this coming year. Is global warming on the
wane?

Look inside the 2009 edition.

Buy a copy of The 2009 Old Farmer’s
Almanac
!

Sincerely, The Old Farmer’s
Almanac

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It’s a quick and easy way to let someone know all the news at
almanac.com.

September 15—Full Harvest Moon

The Harvest Moon is the full Moon nearest the
autumnal equinox and is bright enough to allow finishing all
of the harvest chores. Learn more about full Moon
names.

September
17—Citizenship Day

Formerly called Constitution Day, Citizenship
Day marks the anniversary of the date in 1787 when the final
draft of the constitution of the United States was signed by
delegates to the Constitutional Convention after months of
wrangling.

September
17, 19, 20—Ember Days

Folklore has it that the weather on each of
these three days foretells the weather for three successive
months; that is, Wednesday, September 17, forecasts the
weather for October; Friday, September 19, for November; and
Saturday, September 20, for December.

September 22—Autumnal Equinox

Fall begins at 11:44 A.M. (Eastern Time) today.
The autumnal equinox is defined as the point at which the Sun
appears to cross the celestial equator from north to south.
The celestial equator is the circle in the celestial sphere
halfway between the celestial poles. It can be thought of as
the plane of Earth’s equator projected out onto the sphere.
The word equinox means “equal night,” when night and
day are of the same duration.

September 22—Harvest Home

In Europe, the conclusion of the harvest each
autumn was once marked by festivals of fun, feasting, and
thanksgiving known as “Harvest Home.” It was also a time to
hold elections, pay workers, and collect rents. These
festivals usually took place around the time of the autumnal
equinox.

SURVEY THE SHRUBBERY

This is the best time to plant dormant
evergreen trees and shrubs.

Correct any soil deficiencies you’ve
noticed. Healthy soil is crucial to healthy plants.

Check coniferous trees for tip damage on
new growth. If the tips have been mutilated by borers or
otherwise damaged, remove them and establish a new leader by
forcing a new side shoot into an upright position.

Young trees should be staked to prevent
the roots from being pulled by fall and winter winds.

See our gardening pages for more timely
advice
.

GARDEN MUSINGS PODCAST

Listen to the September Garden Musings and
learn why weeds love gardens
.

Simple ways to clean and refresh your floors and
carpets.

Carpet Freshener
1 cup crushed dried
herbs (such as rosemary, southernwood, or lavender)
1
teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2
teaspoons baking soda

Combine all the ingredients in a large jar or
other container with a tight-fitting lid. Shake well to blend.
Sprinkle some of the mixture on your carpet, let it sit for an
hour or so, and then vacuum it up. It will give the room a
pleasant smell and neutralize carpet odors.

Wood Floor Polish
1/2 cup vinegar

1/2 cup vegetable oil

Mix the ingredients well, rub on the floor, and
buff with a clean, dry cloth.

Rug Cleaner
1/4 teaspoon dishwashing
liquid
1 cup lukewarm water

Combine the ingredients. Use a spray bottle to
apply the solution over a large area, or use the solution to
spot-clean nongreasy stains. (Don’t use laundry detergent or
dishwasher detergent in place of dishwashing liquid, as they
may contain additives that can affect the rug’s color.)

See our Make Your Own Cleaners list for more money-saving
tips.

We hope you found this newsletter “new, useful,
and entertaining” – just like The Old Farmer’s
Almanac
.

Thanks for reading and sharing it.

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© 2008, Yankee Publishing Inc. All rights
reserved

Yankee Publishing, 1121
Main Street, P.O. Box 520, Dublin, NH 03444, USA, (603)
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